Reaction to Tim Flannery and continued controversy over the Bryan Stow incident.

Another tense moment over a tragic incident in the Dodgers-Giants rivalry as Giants third base coach Tim Flannery (or a member of his band, it is not 100% clear as the note was not signed, but it is presumed that the note was written by Flannery himself) has posted on his band’s Facebook page the following message in the wake of last night’s game in which San Francisco-based Dodger fan Casey Johnstone, who’s viral video (seen above) about being a Dodger fan has resulted in over $200 worth of revenues which he graciously donated to Bryan Stow’s family for his continued medical care.

“Tonight the Dodgers did something that really pissed me off…yeah they beat us, they are better this time around, but this is about other stuff..they honored Casey Johnstone the kid who made a video and gave his $200 bucks to Bryan Stow…but the Dodgers never ever mentioned What the kid did with his money, or Bryan’s name. I once had a Dodger broadcaster tell me ” we wish he would just go away”…..ok…more shows for Bryan…another way to shine the light, and to the Dodgers how you handled this pregame first pitch tonight….you just got me started all over again……we won’t go away, till you do what is right here..had your chance tonight……failed in the humanity department….”

The reaction to this message has been met with everything from verbal/text-based support for Flannery and Stow to outrage that Flannery would accuse the Dodgers of being classless.

The Blog feels that this is relevant and would like to make its take on the matter be known.

The reality is that the Stow incident incites many emotions.   There is never, ever an excuse to do harm to another human being based solely on words.  Trash talk, even offensive trash talk, is common in rivalry.  It is true that Bryan Stow may have involved himself in verbal confrontations throughout the night on Opening Night 2011.  The reality is, Mr. Stow was not a threat to Dodger fans.  His words did not injure.  When the game was over and Mr. Stow headed with his group to their vehicle in the parking lot, they should have not been subject to any sort of physical action or retaliation.

The reality is, the parking lot was dark, 56,000 people were leaving the ballpark, and the area was not properly lit or secured.  The Dodgers owner at the time, Frank McCourt, neglected to properly secure the lot, to ensure the safety of the fans leaving the ballpark.  This incident could have been avoided.

Let’s face the facts, we all get heated from time to time when it comes to playing our rivals.  Tempers raise.  Words are spoken.  Insults hurled.  Should any of our friends, families, spouses or childrens’ lives be forever altered because of it?  When I see pictures of Bryan Stow with his children, I realize, he doesn’t look too different from me.  Proud smile on a father’s face, happy children in a happier time who love their father.

I would like to show you all that picture right now.  I’d like you all to see the face of this man and those children and understand what was lost here, and ask yourselves, was what happened to him really necessary?  Didn’t Frank McCourt have an obligation to ensure that something like this wouldn’t happen on the grounds at Dodger Stadium?

Bryan Stow with his son Tyler and daughter Tabitha before the attack. (Image source: http://kion.images.worldnow.com/images/14694272_BG1.jpg)

Bryan’s life was changed forever.  Bryan’s family’s lives were changed forever.  Forget for a moment that Bryan will likely never work or be able to provide for his family again in a traditional sense.  Those two children will never know their father the way that they would have otherwise known him.  So he said a few bad things about Dodger dogs.  Was it worth beating him to a point that he suffered severe brain damage?  Was it worth the decades in prison that his attackers now face?

Bryan Stow’s attackers Marvin Norwood and Louie Sanchez with their attorney in court last May. (Image source: San Francisco Chronicle at http://ww3.hdnux.com/photos/13/47/07/3043782/3/628×471.jpg)

Absolutely, positively, it was not.

The Dodger organization still faces legal action from the Stow family over the incident.  Perhaps this is why they did not mention that Casey Johnstone’s viral video money was being donated to Stow and his family.

However, in light of what Tim Flannery has done on his own time to benefit Mr. Stow and his family, his anger is real and justified.  His band, Tim Flannery and Lunatic Fringe, has raised over $75,000 in support of Stow’s cause.  When Mr. Flannery speaks about the Stow family’s plight, he’s not just speaking words, he’s speaking passionately about a man and a family he has worked hard to help.

As fans, we should be as angry as Tim Flannery is that something like this could happen.  We should be angry that a man who was beaten within an inch of his life is not receiving the medical care that he needs due to “lifetime caps” being met on his insurance policy.

If you are interested in learning more about Bryan’s current progress or how you can help, you can check up on the latest at support4bryanstow.com.

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